Nov 29, 2021  
2018-2019 Catalog 
    
2018-2019 Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 
  
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    COMX 298 - Internship

    1 - 6 credits (Variable)
    For academic work done in conjunction with an approved work experience related to the PTC degree program. Students should consult with their faculty advisor to determine the availability of appropriate work experience and the specific academic requirements for receiving credit.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of one semester of course work and Consent of Instructor. May be repeated once for credit. Course offered on demand.
  
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    COMX 310 - Group Dynamics Theory and Practice

    3 credits (Hrs: 3 Lec.)
    A study of decision-making, leadership and interpersonal communication in the small group. Intensive involvement in small problem-solving groups and participation in panel discussions and symposiums.

    Course generally offered 2nd semester.
  
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    COMX 314W - Business and Professional Speaking

    3 credits (Hrs: 3 Lec.)
    Examines communicative behavior in complex organizations. Change, conflict, decision-making, development and leadership are considered as communication variables within the organizational setting. Focuses on problems in management communication, leadership in meetings, conference procedures, interviewing techniques, and the delivery of scientific and professional speeches.

    Satisfies upper division Writing core. Course generally offered 2nd semester.
  
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    COMX 317W - Interpersonal Communication Theory and Practice

    3 credits (Hrs: 3 Lec.)
    Considers the nature and role of person-to-person communication and influence transactions. Emphasizes the development of knowledge and skills applicable to face-to-face interactions between individuals.

    Satisfies upper division Writing core. Course generally offered 1st semester.
  
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    COMX 338 - Usability Testing

    3 credits (Hrs: 3 Lec)
  
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    COMX 338W - Usability Testing

    3 credits (Hrs: 3 Lec.)
    Principles/concepts of usability testing, including human factors and software psychology. Text-based, expert-based, reader-based, and prototype-based user testing. An introduction to user-centered product-development, and hands-on step-by-step discussion of test design augmented by discussion and strategy. Developing objectives, criteria, and measures. Conducting usability test in lab, field, and virtual environments. Using usability testing software programs to analyze qualitative/quantitative data.

    Prerequisite(s):    or consent of instructor. Satisfies upper division Writing core.
  
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    COMX 342 - Advanced Argumentation

    3 credits (Hrs: 3 Lec.)
    Covers theories and techniques of argumentation and the critical analysis of selected argumentative speeches. Logic, analysis of proposition, briefing, tests of evidence, reasoning and fallacies in reasoning are stressed.

    Prerequisite(s): COMX 111  or Consent of Instructor. Course generally offered 2nd semester.
  
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    COMX 345 - Gender of the Rhetoric of Science & Technology

    3 credits (Hrs: 3 Lec.)
    In this course, gender will be viewed as a social construct. Students will examine how cultural gender roles are affected by science and technology. The course focuses on the influence of gender roles on scientific and technological thinking (e.g., communication strategies, language, image). Students will explore the values and goals of past and present scientific and technological communities in terms of the issues related to gender roles in these communities as they are reflected in the profession of technical communication.

    Course offered on demand.
  
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    COMX 348W - Intro To Desktop Publishing

    3 credits (Hrs: 3 Lec.)
    Immerses students in both concepts and skills of contemporary PC-based electronic publishing. Covers principles of document design, graphic design, layout, and typography. Reviews publishing technologies, systems, and business/legal issues. Required lab session ensures development of hands-on skills using current-generation publishing hardware and software.

    Prerequisite(s): COMX 140 , Consent of Instructor, and current computer-usage skills. Satisfies upper division Writing core.
  
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    COMX 392 - Independent Study

    (Variable)
    Conference, research and independent reading in a field of special interest arranged with an instructor in the PTC Department. Reading and research may be oriented to concurrent work, but must not replace subject matter of regularly scheduled courses.

    Prerequisite(s): Junior standing, Consent of Instructor, and prior departmental approval. May be repeated a maximum of four times for credit. Course generally offered both semesters.
  
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    COMX 400 - Communication Theory

    3 credits (Hrs: 3 Lec.)
    Survey of the contributions of behavioral sciences and philosophy to a unified theory of communication. Topics include the nature and development of contemporary communication theory, analysis of general and specific theories of communication, critiques of communication theory, humanistic contributions to communication theory, and future directions of communication theory.

  
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    COMX 415 - Intercultural Communication

    3 credits (Hrs: 3 Lec.)
    This course preparesstudents for global communication, as it focuses on communication principles and processes in cross-cultural environments. Norms are explicated through contrasts between Western and non-Western modes of communication.

    Satisfies Social Science core. Course generally offered 1st semester.
  
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    COMX 441W - Rhetorical Theories & Criticism in Technical Communication

    3 credits (Hrs: 3 Lec.)
    Students examine the rhetorical theories of communication that have existed since classical times and those that have been developed in modern times, as these theories continue to inform effective decision-making strategies in professional communication. This course preparesstudents to view professional communication broadly as a culturally situated form of social action and production. Students integrate the discipline of rhetoric with the contemporary practice and academic field of professional communication, as they analyze contemporary issues, debates, and achievements in rhetorical theories relating to current professional communication practices.

    Prerequisite(s): Prerequisite Junior standing for undergraduates; graduate standing or permission of instructor for MSTC students. Satisfies upper division Writing core. Course generally offered 2nd semester.
  
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    COMX 442W - History, Technology, and Communication

    3 credits (Hrs: 3 Lec.)
    Technical communication involves both the communication of technical information and the use of technologies to communicate. As civilizations change over time, increasing demands are placed on the ability to manipulate information. In this course, we shall examine both the cognitive maps cultures construct to communicate and the manner in which these maps profoundly alter human nature. (STET)

    Prerequisite(s): Senior standing;   or STS 2016 , or Consent of Instructor. Satisfies upper division Writing core. Course generally offered 2nd semester.
  
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    COMX 448 - Desktop Publishing

    3 credits (Hrs: 3 Lec.)
  
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    COMX 490 - Undergraduate Research

    1 credit (Variable)
    This course is designed for students involved in directed research projects and is required for participants in the Undergraduate Research Program (URP). This course can be repeated. Students will be required to prepare a formal paper and present their results. A faculty member must advise the project. Pending the number of credits taken, graduation requirements, and as demanded of the research advisor, other requirements may be needed. To participate in URP, students must submit a proposal for a research project to the Undergraduate Research Committee and meet other requirements as listed in URP guidelines. Proposals are evaluated competitively and winners will receive a stipend. URP participants must register for this class in the Spring for at least one credit in order to present their findings in the annual Undergraduate Research Conference. A call for proposals is made at the beginning of the Spring Semester. Another call may be offered in the Fall Semester.

    Course generally offered year round.
  
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    COMX 491 - Special Topics

    (Variable)
    Specific topic is to be determined by faculty member offering the course. Deals with some aspect of English/Communication not covered by an existing course. Designed to complement present departmental offerings.

    Prerequisite(s): Advanced standing. Course generally offered both semesters.
  
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    COMX 498 - Internship

    1 - 6 credits (Variable)
    For academic work done in conjunction with an approved work experience related to the PTC degree program. Students should consult with their faculty advisor to determine the availability of appropriate work experiences and the specific academic requirements for receiving credit.

    Prerequisite(s): Junior standing and Consent of Instructor. May be repeated once for credit. Course offered on demand.
  
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    COMX 499W - Thesis/Capstone

    2 credits (Hrs: 2 Lec.)
    Senior thesis is a capstone PTC course that demonstrates a culmination of student communication skills. The completed project represents (minimally) a 200-hour project, approved by Department faculty and completed independently while relying on college resources. Normal assignment of credit is two credits for fall semester when project proposals are prepared and approved and two credits for spring semester, when projects are completed and presented, and when final student portfolios are also presented.

    Satisfies upper division Writing core. Course generally offered both semesters.
  
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    CRWR 110 - Beginning Fiction

    3 credits (3 Lec.)
    Beginning Fiction will introduce students to the craft of writing fiction. Students will start by writing shorter, more focused assignments, and build toward completing full-length short stories to be discussed in a workshop format. Students will also read published short stories and analyze both their form and content.

  
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    CRWR 340 - Intermediate Creative Writing Workshop

    3 credits (Hrs: 3 Lab)
    A course in writing imaginative literature of all kinds: short fiction, poetry, drama, exposition, and longer fiction.

    Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor. Course generally offered 2nd semester.
  
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    CSCI 100 - Intro to Programming

    3 credits (Hrs: 3 Lec.)
    Course provides an introduction to computer programming using the Visual Basic programming language.

    Course generally offered 1st semester.
  
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    CSCI 101 - Computational Thinking

    2 credits (Hrs: 2 Lec.)
    Computational thinking involves solving problems, designing systems, and understanding human behavior, by drawing on the concepts fundamental to computer science. It is the study of an effective approach used by people to solve problems. Critical thinking involves the systematic evaluation of information, and is a crucial piece of problem solving. The two are combined in this course to provide the student with a powerful set of tools to understand and solve the kinds of problems they will encounter in their college studies and future careers.

    Satisfies Social Science core Course generally offered 1st semester.
  
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    CSCI 102 - Computational Thinking with Lab

    3 credits (Hrs: 2 Lec., 3 Lab)
    Computational thinking involves solving problems, designing systems, and understanding human behavior, by drawing on the concepts fundamental to computer science. It is the study of an effective approach used by people to solve problems. Critical thinking involves the systematic evaluation of information, and is a crucial piece of problem solving. The two are combined in this course to provide the student with a powerful set of tools to understand and solve the kinds of problems they will encounter in their college studies and future careers. The lab incorporates a programming component.  In this programming lab, students learn to carefully and systematically analyze problems and demonstrate the correctness of their solution by implementing it in program code.

    Satisfies Social Science core Course generally offered 1st semester.
  
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    CSCI 107 - The Joy and Beauty of Computing

    3 credits (3 hrs Lec)
    Examines the computing field and how it impacts the human condition. Introduces exciting ideas and influential people. Provides a gentle introduction to computational thinking using the Python programming language.

  
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    CSCI 110 - Programming with Visual Basic I

    3 credits (Hrs: 3 Lec.)
    An introduction to problem-solving methods and algorithm development in an Object-oriented environment. Stresses techniques of good programming style. (This course may not be substituted for   ).

    Prerequisite(s): High School Algebra. Course generally offered both semesters.
  
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    CSCI 111 - Programming with Java I

    3 credits (Hrs: 3 Lec.)
    This course introduces the beginning programmer to the fundamentals of object-oriented programming while becoming acquainted with many of the core features of Java. The student will be exposed to the creation of a variety of games and applications. After the basics, the student will learn to develop his or her own systems of classes, eventually working with many of Java’s Graphical User Interface (GUI) features and will develop a desktop Windows application.

    Course generally offered in the spring semester.
  
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    CSCI 112 - Programming with C I

    3 credits (Hrs: 2 Lec., 3 Lab)
    An introduction to problem-solving methods and programming techniques that can be applied to C and other programming languages. The student will learn and use C to construct efficient and easy to understand programs for engineers and scientific applications.

    Corequisite(s): M 151 . Course generally offered 2nd semester.
  
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    CSCI 114 - Programming with C#

    3 credits (Hrs: 1 Lec, 3 Lab)
    An introduction to problem-solving methods and algorithm development in an object-oriented environment.  Stresses techniques of good programming style.  (This course may not be substituted for CSCI 135.)

  
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    CSCI 116 - Introduction to Python Programming

    3 credits (Hrs: 3 Lec)
    Students will become acquainted with core programming concepts via the Python programming language.  Students will become familiar with the fundamental principles of Object-Oriented Programming, as well as in-depth data and information processing techniques.  Students will be able to solve problems, explore real-world software development challenges, and create practical and contemporary applications.

  
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    CSCI 117 - Programming with Matlab

    3 credits (Hrs: 2 Lec., 3 Lab)
    An introduction to problem-solving methods and programming techniques using the Matlab programming package. The student will learn to construct efficient and easy to understand programs for engineering and scientific applications.

    Corequisite(s): M 151 . Course generally offered both semesters.
  
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    CSCI 124 - Advanced C#/.NET

    3 credits (Hrs: 3 Lec)
    A follow on to CSCI 114, Programming in C#, that covers the more advanced features of C#; and includes module requirements specification, the construction and analysis of algorithms, and design patterns. This course will not cover arguments for program correctness, or the specification of through module tests.

    Prerequisite(s): CSCI 114  or consent of instructor
  
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    CSCI 135 - Fundmentals Of Computer Science I

    3 credits (Hrs: 3 Lec.)
    This course introduces the beginning programmer to the fundamentals of object-oriented programming while becoming acquainted with many of the core features of Java. The student will be exposed to the creation of a variety of games and applications. After the basics, the student will learn to develop his or her own systems of classes, eventually working with many of Java’s Graphical User Interface (GUI) features and will develop a desktop Windows application.

    Corequisite(s):   Course generally offered 1st semester.
  
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    CSCI 136 - Fundamentals Of Computer Science II

    3 credits (Hrs: 2 Lec., 3 Lab)
    A continuation of   . Explores the finer and more subtle elements of a programming language. Programming techniques and structures include arrays, records, and linked lists.

    Prerequisite(s):   . Course generally offered 2nd semester.
  
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    CSCI 194 - Freshman Seminar

    1 credit (Hrs: 1 Lec.)
    Required introduction to the Computer Science and Software Engineering programs. Students will discuss what it means to be a professional in the fields of computer science and software engineering, meet professionals in these fields, and hear about the wide range of employment opportunities. Throughout the course students will meet the faculty of the Computer Science Department and learn of their diverse expertise. By the end of the course, each student will have developed a resume and a career plan and will have learned how a Tech education prepares them for rewarding employment.

    Course generally offered 1st semester.
  
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    CSCI 210 - Web Programming

    3 credits
    Course generally offered second semester.
  
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    CSCI 232 - Data Structures and Algorithms

    3 credits (Hrs: 3 Lec.)
    Commonly used structures found in computing and the algorithms which manipulate them are studied. Design and analysis of algorithms are emphasized. Topics include stacks, queues, general lists, trees, hashing, searching, and sorting.

    Prerequisite(s): CSCI 136  and M 171   Course generally offered 1st semester.
  
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    CSCI 246 - Discrete Structures

    3 credits (Hrs: 3 Lec.)
    Course includes those mathematical topics which will help students in future courses. It refines problem solving skills by providing a vocabulary, structures and techniques for working with problems. Topics include logic, theorem  proving, properties of sets, functions, relations, and sequences, counting techniques, recursion, and graph theory.

    Prerequisite(s): CSCI 136  &   . Course generally offered 1st semester.
  
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    CSCI 255 - Introduction to Embedded Systems

    3 credits (Hrs: 2 Lec, 3 Lab)
    Develops basic concepts of computer systems and computer architecture. Includes base-2 arithmetic, octal and hexadecimal number systems, computer addressing modes, I/O, and assemblers.

    Prerequisite(s): CSCI 135  , CSCI 112  or Consent of Instructor. Course generally offered 1st semester.
  
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    CSCI 291 - Special Topics

    (Variable)
    Course title depends on topic. This course may be repeated as often as desirable.

    Course offered on demand.
  
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    CSCI 292 - Independent Study

    (Variable)
    Designed to allow students to work independently on a significant computing problem. Student must be directly supervised by a member of the Computer Science Department. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits.

    Course offered on demand.
  
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    CSCI 298 - Internship

    1 - 6 credits (Variable)
    For academic work in conjunction with an approved work experience related to Computer Science.

  
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    CSCI 305 - Concepts of Programming Languages

    3 credits (Hrs: 3 Lec.)
    Students will study concepts of high-level programming languages. Topics include regular expressions, context free grammars, programming language syntax, semantics, language translation and how language constructs are implemented. Projects include a lexical analyzer and/or a parser. Students will also program in a functional and a logic language.
     

    Prerequisite(s): CSCI 232 . Course generally offered 1st semester.
  
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    CSCI 311 - Data Driven Web Applications

    3 credits (Hrs: 3 Lec.)


    Students learn to develop data driven web applications. Topics include XHTML, CSS, SQL, PHP, JavaScript, web design principles and user-centered design. Students get a chance to develop a simple web application of their choice.

     

    Prerequisite(s): CSCI 135  or CSCI 110 , or consent of instructor. Course generally offered 2nd semester.

  
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    CSCI 321 - Systems Design Process

    3 credits
    Articulates the areas of computer technology, systems analysis, and systems design. Students are involved in designing complete computing systems for a range of applications, from the small business system to a large mainframe environment.

    Prerequisite(s): CSCI 135  or CSCI 114  or CSCI 110 Course generally offered 1st semester.
  
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    CSCI 332 - Design & Analysis of Algorithms

    3 credits (Hrs: 3 Lec.)
    Uses and reinforces basic data structure knowledge and techniques from Data Structures and Algorithms (CSCI 232 ). Covers several advanced data structures, including balanced search trees and graphs. Studies common algorithm design methods (Brute Force, Decrease and Conquer, Divide and Conquer, Greedy, and Dynamic Programming) to solve various classic problems. Ehmphasizes the space and time complexitites of various data structures and their associated algorithms.

    Prerequisite(s): CSCI 232  and CSCI 246   Course generally offered 2nd semester.
  
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    CSCI 340 - Database Design

    3 credits (Hrs: 3 Lec.)
    Studies concepts and applications in database management including the relational model, relational algebra, Structural Query Language (SQL), normalization, transactions, and how to avoid SQL-injection.  XML, No SQL and Big Data are introduced.  Information stewardship is discussed.  Students get a chance to prototype a database application working in groups.

    Prerequisite(s): CSCI 136 , or CSCI 310 , or CSCI 117  & CSCI 112 . Course generally offered 2nd semester.
  
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    CSCI 347 - Data Mining

    3 credits (Hrs: 3 Lec.)
    Provides a grounding in data mining techniques and prepares students to design, use, and evaluate these techniques in a variety of application domains and for the purpose of decision support. Topics include decision trees, rule based systems, statistical approaches, neural networks, and instance-based approaches.

    Prerequisite(s): ( CSCI 110  or CSCI 135  or CSCI 117 ) and (CAPP 158  or CSCI 340 ) Course generally offered 1st semester.
  
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    CSCI 361 - Computer Architecture

    3 credits (Hrs: 3 Lec.)
    Studies the design and organization of computer systems, including the instruction set and interconnection of hardware components. Topics include computer performance, assembly language programming, microprocessor architecture, pipeline processing, memory and storage organization, and multiprocessor computers.

    Prerequisite(s): CSCI 255   Course generally offered 2nd semester.
  
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    CSCI 438 - Theory Of Computation

    3 credits (Hrs: 3 Lec.)
    Students will look abstractly at computers and what it means to be computable. Turing Machines, which appear to be powerful enough to serve as the basis for defining computability, will be studied. Students will learn that some questions are not computable by any computing machine. Regular, context-free languages, decidability and computational complexity will also be studied.

    Prerequisite(s): CSCI 305   Course generally offered 2nd semester.
  
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    CSCI 441 - Computer Graphics

    3 credits (Hrs: 3 Lec.)
    This is a programming and math intensive course which develops the fundamental concepts and algorithms used in computer graphics from first principals.

    Prerequisite(s): CSCI 332  & M 333 .   Course is generally offered 2nd semester.
  
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    CSCI 443 - User Interface Design

    3 credits (Hrs: 3 Lec.)
    Provides an introduction to designing user interfaces for a variety of interactive systems. The design process emphasizes the development of software systems from a user, rather than system-oriented, perspective. The course focuses on using real users to complete the specification, design, evaluation, and testing of the interface. Students will learn both human (cognitive) and technological tools for designing and building interfaces. The course also presents human-computer interaction concepts and theory, which involves computer science, psychology, social behavior, and other human factors associated with computer use.

    Corequisite(s): ESOF 322 . Course generally offered 1st semester.
  
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    CSCI 444 - Data Visualization

    3 credits
    Covers the principles, methods, and techniques for effective visual analysis of data. Students will use both common and special software packages to explore different visualization applications. Students will learn how to formulate 3-D numerical models, translate 3-D models into graphical displays, and create time sequences and pseudo-animations.  The course covers interactive versus presentation techniques and special techniques for video, DVD, and other media displays.

    Prerequisite(s): CSCI 112  , CSCI 117  , or CSCI 135  
  
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    CSCI 446 - Artificial Intelligence

    3 credits (Hrs: 3 Lec.)
    An introduction to the basic concepts of Artificial Intelligence. Topics to be covered include the history of AI, the problems treated in AI, solution techniques, state spaces, search algorithms and heuristics, expert systems, natural language processing, and robotics.

    Prerequisite(s): CSCI 332 . Course generally offered 1st semester.
  
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    CSCI 447 - Machine Learning

    3 credits (3 hrs Lec)
    Introduction to the framework of learning from examples, various learning algorithms such as neural networks, and generic learning principles such as inductive bias, Occam's Razor, and data mining. Reviews some statistical learning techniques, but focus is on non-statistical techniques.

  
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    CSCI 460 - Operating Systems

    3 credits (Hrs: 3 Lec.)
    I/O management, memory management, processor management, device management and performance measurement/evaluation are examined. Other operating systems, theoretical and current, are discussed.

    Prerequisite(s): CSCI 255   and CSCI 332   Course generally offered 2nd semester.
  
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    CSCI 466 - Networks

    3 credits (Hrs: 3 Lec.)
    A study of the fundamental principles of computer based communication. Principles, design, and standards of networks will be discussed, including standard network protocols. Includes an introduction to telecommunications and basic data transfer processes.

    Prerequisite(s): CSCI 332 . Course generally offered 1st semester.
  
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    CSCI 470 - Web Science

    3 credits (Hrs: 3 Lec.)
    This course is designed to give the student an understanding of the plumbing that makes the web work. It covers basic and some advanced technologies currently being used in web based systems and provides an overview of the technical issues surrounding the web. Students successfully completing this course will learn to employ web technologies to build high-value web applications.

    Prerequisite(s): CSCI 466 . Course generally offered 2nd semester.
  
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    CSCI 477 - Computer Modeling and Simulation

    3 credits (3 hrs Lec)
    Covers various computational modeling and simulation principles and techniques applicable to various domains of engineering and science. Students will implement and apply these methods, including model verification and validation, for basic examples. Students will then complete a project within their discipline to design a representative model, implement the model, complete a verification and validation of the model, and update the model to reflect corrections, improvements and enhancements. Specific topics include matrix languages, ODE solving, PDE solving, finite difference approximation, finite element methods, and visualize data generated from computer simulations.

    Prerequisite(s): CSCI 112  ,CSCI 117  , or CSCI 135  
  
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    CSCI 479 - Scientific Computing

    3 credits (3 Lec, 1 Lab)
    Provides an overview of computer hardware, software, and numerical methods that are useful for scientific computing on workstations and high performance computing (HPC) systems. Topics include HPC architectures, parallel programming, software tools and packages, algorithm design, characteristics of commonly used numerical methods, mapping of solution methods to modern multi-processor systems, and performance analysis.

    Prerequisite(s): CSCI 232   and (M 426  or CSCI 477  )
  
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    CSCI 486 - Senior Project

    1 - 6 credits (Variable)
    Individual or small group pursuit of a project preferably an advanced topic in computing. Prerequisite: Senior standing, Consent of Instructor and department head.

    Course generally offered both semesters.
  
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    CSCI 491 - Special Topics

    (Variable)
    Course title depends on topic. This course may be repeated as often as desirable.

  
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    CSCI 492 - Independent Study

    (Variable)
    Designed to allow students to work independently on a significant computing problem. Student must be directly supervised by a member of the Computer Science Department. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits.

    Course offered on demand.
  
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    CSCI 494 - Seminar

    1 credit (Hrs: 1 Lec.)
    Investigations in the Computer Science and Software Engineering fields. Students will report on their internship experience, present their senior design projects, and/or present their undergraduate research. Faculty and guest speakers will discuss current issues in computer science and software engineering, Students will take an exam covering their computer-related course work. Students will demonstrate their ability to apply a computer-related code of ethics (ACM, IEEE, or SE). This is a required seminar for computer science and software engineering seniors. Prerequisite: Senior standing or Consent of Instructor.

    Course generally offered 2nd semester.
  
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    CSCI 498 - Internship

    1 - 6 credits (Variable)
    For academic work done in conjunction with an approved work experience related to the Computer Science degree program. Students should consult with their faculty advisor and/or department Internship Coordinator to determine the availability of appropriate work experiences and the specific academic requirements for receiving credit.

    Prerequisite(s): Junior standing and Consent of Instructor. May be repeated once for credit. Course offered on demand.
  
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    CSCI 499 - Capstone: Data Science Project

    1-4 credits
  
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    CSCI 544 - Data Visualization

    3 credits (3 hrs Lec)
    Covers the principles, methods, and techniques for effective visual analysis of data. Students will use both common and special software packages to explore different visualization applications. Students will learn how to formulate 3-D numerical models, translate 3-D models into graphical displays, and create time sequences and pseudo-animations.  The course covers interactive versus presentation techniques and special techniques for video, DVD, and other media displays.

    Prerequisite(s): CSCI 112  , CSCI 117  , or CSCI 135  
  
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    CSCI 577 - Computer Modeling and Simulation

    3 credits (3 hrs Lec)
    Covers various computational modeling and simulation principles and techniques applicable to various domains of engineering and science. Students will implement and apply these methods, including model verification and validation, for basic examples. Students will then complete a project within their discipline to design a representative model, implement the model, complete a verification and validation of the model, and update the model to reflect corrections, improvements and enhancements. Specific topics include matrix languages, ODE solving, PDE solving, finite difference approximation, finite element methods, and visualize data generated from computer simulations.

    Prerequisite(s): CSCI 112  , CSCI 117  , or CSCI 135  
  
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    CSCI 579 - Scientific Computing

    3 credits (3 hrs Lec)
    Provides an overview of computer hardware, software, and numerical methods that are useful for scientific computing on workstations and high performance computing (HPC) systems. Topics include HPC architectures, parallel programming, software tools and packages, algorithm design, characteristics of commonly used numerical methods, mapping of solution methods to modern multi-processor systems, and performance analysis.

    Prerequisite(s): CSCI 232   and (M 426  or CSCI 477  )
  
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    CSCI 599 - Computational Science Project

    3 credits
    An individual research or design project in computational science. The project will be interdisciplinary in nature combining computing within a domain specific scientific discipline.

    Prerequisite(s): M 526 or CSCI 577
  
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    CSTN 100 - Fundamentals of Construction Technology

    3 credits
    Explore the basics in construction-related safety equipment. It also covers proper safety procedures in the operation of hand and power tools.

  
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    CSTN 120 - Carpentry Basics & Rough-In Framing

    7 credits
    Introduces the carpentry trade, including history, career opportunities, and requirements. This course covers a variety of building materials, fasteners, and adhesives. It also covers installation procedures for windows and exterior doors. Skills required for framing a simple structure are studied and practiced.

  
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    CSTN 145 - Exterior Finishing, Stair, & Metal Stud Framing

    4 credits
    Introduces students to materials and methods for sheathing, exterior siding, stairs and roofing. Students will layout and build a simple stair system as well as a metal stud wall with door and window openings.

    Prerequisite(s): CSTN 100  and CSTN 120  or instructor's approval.
  
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    CSTN 147 - Blueprint Reading

    3 credits (Hrs: 3 Lec.)
    Concentrates on concepts associated with blueprint reading, sketching, and interpreting light commercial and residential drawings.  It includes instruction in the recognition of construction materials, procedures, and specifications.  This course also covers trade-specific symbols found on construction drawings.

  
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    CSTN 160 - Constructn Concepts & Building Lab

    3 credits
    Provides hands-on experience in which the student applies, with minimal supervision, the basic skills and knowledge presented thus far in the NCCER Carpentry Program. This course is designed as a practical task-orientated application utilizing the skills covered in CSTN 120  as well as in parts of CSTN 145 .

    Prerequisite(s): CSTN 120  and CSTN 148  or instructor’s approval.
  
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    CSTN 161 - Construction Concepts & Building Lab II

    3 credits
  
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    CSTN 170 - Site Layout

    3 credits
    Explores the process of distance measurement, differential and trigonometric leveling for site layout. It covers the principles, equipment, and methods used to perform the site layout tasks that require making angular measurements. This course is designed to let students apply the blueprint reading skills learned so far to a practical exercise.

    Prerequisite(s): CSTN 100  or instructor’s approval.
  
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    CSTN 201 - Advanced Concrete Working

    5 credits
    Introduce building forms for footings and foundations as well as for a variety of concrete structures. It introduces methods for handling, placing, and finishing concrete. It also covers manufactured forms and their applications.

    Prerequisite(s): CSTN 100  or instructor’s approval.
  
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    CSTN 220 - Interior Finishing

    4 credits
    Cover interior building materials. This course covers materials and installation techniques for interior trim, counter top, base cabinet, and wall cabinet. It also covers suspended ceiling materials, layout, and installation as well as wood and metal door installation.

    Prerequisite(s): CSTN 120  and CSTN 148  or instructor’s approval.
  
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    CSTN 250 - Construction Estimating

    3 credits (Hrs: 3 Lec.)
    This course includes instruction in the recognition of construction materials, procedures, specification, codes and methods of estimating construction costs from blueprints.  This course also covers trade-specific symbols found on construction drawings.

    Prerequisite(s):
      Corequisite(s): Co-req: CSTN 147  Blueprint Reading or instructor approval.
  
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    CSTN 251 - Building Methods and Materials

    4 credits (Hrs: 4 Lec.)
    This course is designed to cover the methods and materials used to construct commercial and residential buildings. Blueprint reading is introduced to show material relationships and methods of construction. Product research, building codes, case studies, reference manuals, and sizes of structural steel components will also be covered in this course.

    Corequisite(s): DDSN 114 . Course generally offered 2nd semester.
  
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    CSTN 260 - Construction Concepts & Building Lab II

    3 credits
    Provides students the opportunity to practice skills they have acquired in the entire carpentry program. It includes task-orientated projects in which students can apply many of the skills and knowledge that have been presented throughout the NCCER Carpentry program. This course is designed as a practical task-oriented exercise utilizing a variety of skills covered in all the NCCER carpentry courses required for the A.A.S degree.

  
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    CSTN 271 - Construction Project Management

    3 credits (Hrs: 3 Lec.)
  
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    CSTN 281 - Construction Project Management II

    3 credits (Hrs: 3 Lec.)
  
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    CSTN 291 - Special Topics

    3 credits (Hrs: 3 Lec.)
  
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    D.T. 0120 - Technical Drawing II

    3 credits (Hrs: 1 Lec., 2 Lab)
    This course is a continuation of DDSN 113  - Technical Drawing I - and covers more advanced multi-view drawings, dimensioning techniques, sectional views, auxiliary views and revolutions, descriptive geometry, threads and fasteners, pictorial drawings including isometric and oblique drawings, tolerancing, and a brief coverage of electrical/electronic, piping, welding and structural drawings.

    Prerequisite(s): DDSN 113 . Course generally offered 2nd semester.
  
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    D.T. 0250 - Building Methods And Materials

    4 credits (Hrs: 4 Lec.)
    This course is designed to cover the methods and materials used to construct commercial and residential buildings. Blueprint reading is introduced to show material relationships and methods of construction. Product re¬search, building codes, case studies, reference manuals, and sizes of structural steel components will also be covered in this course.

    Course generally offered 2nd semester.
  
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    DDSN 113 - Technical Drafting

    4 credits (Hrs: 3 Lec., 3 Lab)
    This course provides an introduction to the basics of drafting. Topics covered in this course include an identification of drafting equipment and its use, lettering fundamentals, line-work used on engineering drawings, geometric constructions, theories of multi-view projection, sketching techniques, principles of orthographic projection using two- and three-view drawings, basic dimensioning techniques, basic isometric drawings, and a brief coverage of sectional views. Material covered in this course will not only provide a strong basis for manual drafting, but will also benefit students who will take computer aided design drafting (CADD) courses later on in the drafting program.

    Course generally offered 1st semester.
  
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    DDSN 114 - Introduction to CAD

    3 credits (Hrs: 2 Lec., 3 Lab)
    This course is designed to cover the basic AutoCAD 2D commands and procedures. The course covers drawing setup, computation for scale factors, geometric construction, sectional views, basic architectural room layouts, and civil plot plans. Annotation of drawing is also covered by the use of text and dimensions.

    Corequisite(s): DDSN 113   Course generally offered 1st semester.
  
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    DDSN 116 - 3D CAD

    3 credits (Hrs: 2 Lec., 3 Lab)
    This course is a continuation of DDSN 114  and covers some of the more advanced drafting procedures using AutoCAD. Block attributes and the extraction of the block information is the main focus of this course. The information extracted can be used in word processed documents and spreadsheets to create bill of materials and part lists for engineering/architectural drawings.

    Prerequisite(s): DDSN 114   Course generally offered Spring semester.
  
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    DDSN 135 - Solidworks

    3 credits (Hrs: 2 Lec., 3 Lab)
    This course involves using 3D parametric designing software to draw 3D solids. Use of various planes for developing features from sketches; produce assemblies of solid parts and explosions; run interference checks and motion routines; create manufacturing drawings with layouts and parts lists; and annotated isometric drawings. Involves learning to export 3D solid part files for building on 3D printers.

    Prerequisite(s): DDSN 114   Course generally offered fall semester.
  
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    DDSN 137 - Inventor

    3 credits (Hrs: 2 Lec., 3 Lab)
    This course applies various computer hardware and software aspects to complete a project. Students will use various types of computer hardware such as scanners, video capture/output cards, and digitizers to obtain infor¬mation and files used in office projects. Various software and software applications are explored such as the import and export of files, OLE&DDE, referencing, paper space, file conversion, and file name extensions and the software that can use and produce them are also explored.

    Prerequisite(s): DDSN 114   Course generally offered spring semester.
  
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    DDSN 164 - Basic Architectural Drafting

    3 credits (Hrs: 3 Lec.)
    This course is designed to cover basic architectural drafting practices used to draft residential buildings in AutoCAD. Drafting a small residential house is the main project for this class, as well as, blueprint reading as it pertains to architectural design and drafting.

    Prerequisite(s): DDSN 116  and CSTN 251  or CSTN 173   Course generally offered fall semester.
  
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    DDSN 166 - Revit

    3 credits (Hrs: 3 Lec)
    This course is designed as an introduction to architectural CADD using the Autodesk Revit software. As a parametric building modeling software, Revit is a powerful highly in-depth software used to model buildings with built-in intelligence used in Building Information Modeling (BIM) - totally different then using regular AutoCAD. This course will explore the user interface, commands, components, object creation, project creation, schedules and the construction document set.  

    Generally offered fall semester.
  
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    DDSN 198 - Internship

    1 - 6 credits (Variable)
    Combines academic work with an approved work experience related to the Drafting Technology degree program. Students should consult with their faculty advisor and/or departmental Internship Coordinator to determine the availability of appropriate work experiences and the specific academic requirements for receiving credit.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of one semester of course work and Consent of Instructor. May be repeated once for credit. Course offered on demand.
  
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    DDSN 245 - Civil Drafting

    3 credits (Hrs: 3 Lec.)
    The drafting student is presented with a new form of creating drawings. Students work from survey data and field notes to produce site plans, plats, topographic maps and engineering plans.

    Prerequisite(s): DDSN 114  . Course generally offered 1st semester.
  
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    DDSN 246 - Civil Drafting II

    3 credits (Hrs: 3 Lec.)
    This course is a continuation of DDSN 245  Civil Drafting. Students will achieve an advanced knowledge to produce site plans, plats, and civil engineering plans, while utilizing advanced functions of Autodesk Civil 3D. Students will use software specific to civil design/drafting to draw roads with horizontal and vertical curves, pipe inverts, grading, road profiles and cross sections.

    Prerequisite(s): DDSN 245 . Course generally offered spring semester.
  
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    DDSN 265 - Architectural Drafting

    3 credits (Hrs: 3 Lec.)
    This course is a continuation of DDSN 166   Revit (architectural design drafting). This course is designed to cover advanced drafting practices used to draft small commercial buildings. Drafting a commercial building using software specific to architectural drafting is the primary project. Creating schedules which are integral to BIM coordination. Computer mass modeling, component and assembly renderings and complete building renderings will be also be incorporated.

    Prerequisite(s): DDSN 164  and DDSN 166   Course generally offered spring semester.
  
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    DDSN 299 - Capstone

    3 credits (Hrs: 2 Lec., 3 Lab)
    Project will be based on CAD experience. This course is designed to use all the tools and skills the students have learned to produce an advanced project. The project is one that is approved and is to include progress reports, notes and concept sketches, research notes, a project journal, and all drawings, renderings, and animations necessary to best represent the project.

    Prerequisite(s): DDSN 116 . Course generally offered both semesters.
  
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    DSN 291 - Special Topics: Advanced Special Projects

    3 credits (Hrs: 2 Lec., 3 Lab)
    Advanced project will be based on CAD experience. This course is designed to use all the tools and skills the students have learned to produce an advanced project. The project is one that is approved and is to include progress reports, notes and concept sketches, research notes, a project journal, and all drawings, renderings, and animation’s necessary to best represent the advanced project.

    Course offered on demand.
 

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